Author Archives: Brenna Edwards

controlaccess: Relevant Subjects in Archives and Related Fields 2018-12-02

SAA News

Use of Non-government Email Accounts for the Conduct of Public Business

November 2-3, 2018, Council Meeting Minutes

Call for Pre-conference Workshop Proposals: 2019 Joint Annual Meeting

 

Other Professional Happenings

Directory of Archival Consultants Listing Price Reduced!

Apply for the 2019 Archives Leadership Institute

Archives and Archivists in the News

From Gates to Rockefeller, Wealthy Families Hire Personal Historians to Preserve Their Legacy

More than just a trip: pupils get rare access to Guardian archive

Greek-American genealogical experts join forces to support Greece’s archives

Billy Strayhorn Archive Acquired by Library of Congress

An archive honoring the voices and experiences of disabled people

controlaccess: Relevant Subjects in Archives and Related Fields 2018-11-11

SAA News

Call for Student Paper and Poster Proposals: 2019 Joint Annual Meeting

Call for Volunteers: New Committee on Research, Data, and Assessment

Apply for an SAA Foundation Grant

SAA Council Affirms Strategic Goals, Creates Research Committee

 

Other Professional Happenings

Society of American Archivists Oral History Interviews Project, UWM Libraries

Archives and Archivists in the News

A Dallas artist turned archival 35mm films from SMU’s vault into an unlikely cinematic installation

‘I’m Not Just Looking Back… I’m Looking Ahead’: New Coca-Cola Archivist Justine Fletcher Says Company’s Rich History Informs Its Future

ASU Library archivists make marginalized history accessible to all

Writer Haruki Murakami Plans Archive at Japanese University

SAA Session Summaries: 502: This is Not Skynet (Yet)

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Steven Gentry, recent graduate of Simmons University

502: This is Not Skynet (Yet): Why Archivists Should Care About Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Continue reading

SAA Session Summaries: 201: Email Archiving Comes of Age

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Steven Gentry, recent graduate of Simmons University

201: Email Archiving Comes of Age Continue reading

SAA Session Recaps: 702: Charlottesville Speaks

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Rachel Hancock, Project Archivist – Mikulski Senate Papers, John Hopkins University

702: Charlottesville Speaks: Building Frameworks for Documenting Crisis Continue reading

SAA Session Summaries: 103: Archival Engagements and Recordkeeping Intersections with Wicked Problems

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Whitney Ray, Records Management Analyst, State Archives of North Carolina

103: Archival Engagements and Recordkeeping Intersections with Wicked Problems Continue reading

SAA 2018 Session Recaps: 701: (G)LAMonomics

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Sarah Nguyen, MLIS Candidate, University of Washington iSchool

701: (G)LAMonomics: The Economic Drivers and Barriers to Collaboration across Libraries, Archives, and Museums Continue reading

SAA Session Recaps: 601: Prioritizing Processing When Everything is a Priority

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Rachel Hancock, Project Archivist – Mikulski Senate Papers, John Hopkins University

601: Prioritizing Processing When Everything is a Priority Continue reading

SAA Session Recaps: 202: Finding Transparency in Records of Refugee Displacement and Resettlement

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Rachel Hancock, Project Archivist – Mikulski Senate Papers, John Hopkins University

202: Finding Transparency in Records of Refugee Displacement and Resettlement Continue reading

SAA Session Recaps: 208: Use Your Words!

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Regina Carra, Archive Project Metadata and Cataloging Coordinator, Mark Morris Dance Group

208: Use Your Words! Methodologies for User-drive Metadata Description of Time-based Media Continue reading

SAA 2018 Session Recaps: 410: Sharing Our Stories

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Sarah Nguyen, MLIS Candidate, University of Washington iSchool

410: Sharing Our Stories: Using Archival Collections to Develop Commemorative Events

Speakers

First Speaker

Martin T. Olliff presents “The Archives and the Traces of a Small-Town Doughboy’s Obscure Life”.

Family level stories are the most accurate in constructing any histories

HPR Finberg Practice: Writing local and all histories

  1. the self
  2. the family
  3. community
  4. state
  5. Nation

Test by remembering 3-5 events through the above 5 canon of commemorations. They all must agree upon the memory for an accurate story.

  • See JR Goodwin and Irene Pierce for the Alabama family and war history
  • Archivist job is (not) the first family bubble (but truly, it is)—responsible to work across all bubbles when Olliff accepted the collection.
  • Referenced family stories and (mostly wrong) genealogical reports from other family members
  • Scanned 2 portraits, 35 scrapbook of photos, 38 postcards, 2 passes, 11 letters – told about interior lives  (Allowed to obtain originals and scan for digital records. Family kept originals)
  • set of letters informs another side of the story
  • 6 collections and 11 letters were from Godwin himself, but difficult to tell if an item of him prior to him leaving for war

Some items were unknown by the family themselves. E.g. Personnel records at the Alabama military records revealed:

  • he was drafted, people didn’t know
  • not a national guardsman
  • single with sister as emergency contact
  • occupation as telephone lineman and sent to signal core and didn’t have to go into combat
  • Family didn’t know how to access the personnel records. Family didn’t know he had 3 tattoos but revealed on military records.
  • They also didn’t know he spent 5 days at Camp Hospital #64, treated with 1 aspirin/day

Published regimental histories (normally online and easily accessible)

  • 2 military histories gave more info about Godwin’s life (in this case, 81st Infantry Division – Summary of Operations in the World war and 306th Field Signal Battalion).
  • included a paragraph about Godwin
  • troop movement during War to reveal where Godwin travelled around

Conclusion: A story of obscure doughboy augmented from official and unofficial artifacts. Family members memories can be authenticated as years go by, so archivists are needed to survey the artifacts to find the true story.

Second Speaker

Rebekah Davis, from Limestone County Archives, Northern Alabama presents “No Ordinary Lard Bucket: Bringing Life to Judge Horton’s Scottsboro Letters”

This is a case study on: James Edwin Horton Jr. In 2015, the county archives started to raise funds to build monument and the Morgan County Archives created a traveling photography exhibit. Davis met Katherine Horton, Judge Horton was her father, was told that she had a lard bucket with many letter.

  • Lard bucket = original hollinger buckets for the southerners
  • More than 200 letters, resolutions, telegrams and clipping
  • Now, half is housed with the Hortons, and the other half with Samford University
  • Hosted programming to shed light on exhibit, stories, and objects
  • Student help worked with professor to create database of all records, included codes and metadata of all objects.
  • Giving voice to historic documents: taking primary source docs and engaging with public can inspire actions (to get monument created). Letters from “exotic” places, telegrams, from interesting organizations. Bring “new” things to the local community
  • Communist party had strong letters and to release the Scottsborough boys
  • letterhead from the KKK
  • interesting people (people easily found on Google)
  • Interesting message and diction (signed from God)
  • Do not hide hate mail. Death threats from both side need to be saved even though you want to keep the the mood and messaging light.
  • Great opportunity to include a Disclaimer to warn family of that “this next letter contains racial epithets and language which are demeaning by any standard and painful to read…” – provides context to the diverse audience
  • host family and community connections to hold live readings
  • Law Enforcement Training Statewide. Police receiving professional development and continuing education about history and Black Lives Matter stories for their work
  • Know the community and people and how they connect to the primary documents

Third Speaker

Haley Aaron presents “Dinner and a Show: Reader’s Theatre at the Alabama Department of Archives and History”, also known as the Reader’s Theatre ADAH.

This is a WW1 Centennial Commemoration.

The archive contributes regularly to WW1 Centennial Committee via:

  • 2 symposiums
  • 4 public events
  • 3 exhibits
  • multiple lectures

But these regular events lead the archive to be at risk to tell same tropes of war and tell same story over again to point of fatigue after so many years of doing the same thing.

New plan for events:

  1. recreate WW1 menu (5 course dinner based on various menu artifacts). Hired a local caterer to develop menu and play dishes and decorate the centerpieces. Give board members time to talk to take in the scene
  2. Write a script: 5 thematic scenes, 10 min or less each (about 50 min total). A unique way to highlight collections. Immersive experience and develops a diverse and cohesive narratives. But challenges: short time frame to write, revise, prepare script + gaps in collection + logistics for dinner
    1. [a theme]
    2. boys at war, resting, hanging out, resisting hard work
    3. local community of patriotism, local feelings, courage, face of challenge
    4. feelings of loss, highlighting one soldier
    5. end with a hopeful note, feeling of soldiers returning home

Approach:

  • Focus on ADAH collections
  • Find engaging quotes
  • Select and anchor piece to define each scene to define tone and emotions of the scene
  1. Use minimal staging to set the scene using Shakespeare actors to act
    1. projecetd images on screen behind actors like the reader’s theatre format to highlight collections for stakeholders

Keys for Success

  1. Build on the success of previous events
  2. Use local talent
  3. Clearly define your narratives
  4. Select engaging quotes
  5. Use published sources to fill gaps

She’s willing to share script! Reach out to her email for access.

Audience Questions

  1. How to deal with stories that are not uplifting?
    • Haley: let emotional moments speak for themselves. It’s okay to go to the moment of loss and it’s powerful that it’s safe to expect audience to understand
    • Rebekah: Lie and history generally does not have a happy ending but we study it so that we don’t repeat to that sad end
    • Marty: commemoration is about structural power. Memory is different. Authentic memory as opposed to a canonical approach to memory. If you want an authenticate memory then find the original source.
  2. Indefinite loans are highly frowned upon in the archives and museums world. How did you find a permanent home for the letters:
  • Samford University has the permanent collection. Rebekah’s org received permission to access and digitize. Returned to Samford but still allows access during outreach

SAA Session Recap: 104: Making the Invisible Accessible

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Ève Bourbeau-Allard, Archivist, Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

104: Making the Invisible Accessible: The Complex Labor of Archival Accessioning Continue reading

controlaccess: Relevant Subjects in Archives and Related Fields 2018-09-30

SAA News

Ask an Archivist Day is October 3rd! 

October is American Archives Month! 

 

Other Professional Happenings

Business Archives… Establishing and Managing an Archives

Tool Selection and Management: Finding the Right Tool for the Job

Preserving Digital Archives

Archives and Archivists in the News

New archiving platform to preserve Indigenous culture and language

Exhibition Reflects on 1968 Olympic Protest and Its Legacy

After Brazil museum fire, debate over how, or if, to rebuild

SAA 2018 Session Recaps: 709: Beyond the Reference Interview

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Logan Tapscott, trained archivist and librarian with Master degrees in Library and Information Science and Public History

709: Beyond the Reference Interview: Assessing the Reading Room Experience Continue reading

SAA 2018 Session Recaps: 209: More Cooks and a Renovated Kitchen

In advance of the 2018 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Katrina Wood, MAPW, MSLIS

209: More Cooks and a Renovated Kitchen: Developing a Centralized Collaborative Approach to Accessioning Continue reading