Author Archives: Brenna Edwards

Student Experience: First-time Conference Presenter

This post is part of the Student Experience series, which features current and former archives students as they reflect on graduate school, internships, and early career issues. If you would like to contribute a post for this series, please email me

Guest poster Irina Sandler, Simmons College student and archivist at the Baker Library of Harvard Business School as well as the Cambridge Historical Society, discusses her experience as a first time presenter at the New England Archivists Spring 2017 meeting

There is almost nothing as nerve-wracking as public speaking.

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controlaccess: Relevant Subjects in Archives and Related Fields 2017-04-16

This is the weekly roundup of headlines in and around archives, including some library, museum, digital humanities, and information science things as well. If you see something we’ve missed, please email us!

SAA News

ARCHIVES 2017 Registration is now Open! Early Bird Deadline is July 6

Karen Gracy’s book Film Preservation: Competing Definitions of Value, Use & Practice (SAA, 2007) is now out of print, but you can view it for free via HathiTrust

MayDay: Saving Our Archives – May 1

Guide to Implementing Rights Statements from RightsStatements.org

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controlaccess: Relevant Subjects in Archives and Related Fields 2017-03-26

This is the weekly roundup of headlines in and around archives, including some library, museum, digital humanities, and information science things as well. If you see something we’ve missed, please email us!

 

SAA News

Vote in SAA’s 2017 Election!
Submit your ballot by March 31.

SAA Signs on to Letter Regarding Data Provisions in Executive Orders on Immigration

Contribute to the SAA Student Chapter Manual
Part of an SAA student chapter? Consider adding your expertise to the SAA Student Chapter Manual, now in progress.

Survey on SAA Participation
The Membership Committee is seeking feedback on barriers to participation in SAA through a brief three-question survey. The survey will close March 31.

March/April issue of Archival Outlook is out!

 

Other Professional Happenings

Survey for MLIS (or equal) grads in US
Take this survey on how student participation in professional organizations has affected your career

Deadline for ACA Exam
The Academy of Certified Archivists’ exam deadline is May 15.

 

Annual Meeting, July 23-29, 2017

Portland Host Committee Blog

 

Conferences and Trainings

Business Archives…Establishing and Managing an Archives
June 12-14, 2017 at Harley-Davidson Museum, Milwaukee, WI

Georgia Archives Institute
June 12-23, 2017 in Morrow, GA. Application deadline is April 1.

Cultural Diversity Competency
April 5, 2017 in Omaha, NE

 

Archives and Archivists in the News

Archivists Prepare to Finish Orson Welles’ Final Movie ‘The Other Side of the Wind’

Experts find what may be the earliest color film of the White House grounds

 

 

Why You Should Take the Information Services for Diverse Populations Course

This post is part of the Student Experience series, which features current and former archives students as they reflect on graduate school, internships, and early career issues. If you would like to contribute a post for this series, please email me

Guest poster NaVosha Copeland, graduate student at the iSchool at Illinois, discusses her experience with taking an Information Services for Diverse Populations course and what she learned from it. 

navosha ideas photo croppedNo one forced me to take the Information Services for Diverse Populations course at The iSchool at Illinois this semester, but I wanted to for several reasons. First, I was curious about the subject. I studied Race and Difference during my undergraduate studies and I was interested in learning more information about the topic. Secondly, I wanted to be taught by the professor who teaches the course. During Orientation, she gave a short presentation about diversity in the Library and Information Science profession, and I was impressed.

I am enjoying the class, and I am learning a lot, but what I am most enjoying about the course is that my experiences as a Black woman are consistently affirmed by the texts that we read each week, and this has been one of the most gratifying experiences I have had while taking the course. Furthermore, the texts that we read each week challenge and motivate me to better serve people who are different from me. The affirmation and knowledge that I receive in this course should be given to all Library and Information Science professionals, therefore, I make a case for all members of the LIS profession to take a course that teaches them how to properly serve diverse populations.

In our class, we engage with Critical Race Theory and we learn about the ways in which certain communities have been excluded from benefiting from libraries in the United States, due to a particular identity and/or socioeconomic status. The scholars we have read such as: Daniel Solórzano, Tara Yosso, Tracie D. Hall, and Todd Honma, have written texts that have caused me and my classmates to look in the mirror and recognize our privileges, adversities, and shortcomings. We are made aware of books that reveal the history of segregation in public libraries, such as Cheryl Knott’s Not Free, Not For All, which has caused me to recognize the inequalities in libraries and archives that still affect people today. I, too, have experienced this inequity in some of the libraries and archives I have frequented. Gratefully, this class serves as a space where I share my experiences and they are validated.

The discussions in the weekly forum and live classes online give me an opportunity to share my identity and experiences with my classmates. I am one of the few Black people in the class, and this had the potential to get a little awkward because I did not know if my classmates would look to me to speak for all Black people. I cannot do this, and I will not. Also, I did not want to be looked upon by my classmates as the spokesperson for diversity. Gladly, none of these things have occurred in my class. Our discussions are honest and vulnerable, and I am grateful that there is space for us to:

  1. inquire of each other, how do I serve this particular group? and
  2. provide our answers, based on experience and scholarship.

I share this space with my classmates, knowing that my experiences and identities do not make up the totality of diversity. In our class, we learn about how to serve people who are in different groups. I thoroughly enjoy learning about the needs and experiences of others. It is humbling to know that I am not the only one who needs unique services in the libraries and archives, but that others need them too.

I encourage all Library and Information Service professionals to take a course that teaches them how to serve diverse populations. It is vital to decentralize one’s own culture in our profession, in order to serve different groups effectively. We aim to manage and disseminate information, but the information we handle yields much sweeter fruit when it comes from a variety of sources, rather than from one source alone. Let us hold our selves accountable by taking a course that teaches us how to serve diverse populations. As a result of this, we will improve our profession and ourselves.

Addendum: Dr. Nicole Cooke teaches Information Services for Diverse Populations at the iSchool at Illinois. To learn more about enrolling in the course via the iSchool at Illinois or the WISE Consortium, please visit .

NaVosha Copeland is a graduate student in The iSchool at Illinois, pursuing a Master of Science in Library and Information Science, which she will attain in Spring 2018. She is currently a Visual Archives Associate at the Atlanta History Center. To learn more about her projects, follow her on Twitter @navoshacopeland.

controlaccess: Relevant Subjects in Archives and Related Fields 2017-03-05

This is the weekly roundup of headlines in and around archives, including some library, museum, digital humanities, and information science things as well. If you see something we’ve missed, please email us!

SAA News

#snaprt Twitter chat with the Women Archivists Section
Please join the SAA Students and New Archives Professionals Section for the next #snaprt Twitter chat tomorrow, March 6th, 2017 at 8 pm ET, in conjunction with the Women Archivists Section to discuss leadership roles within SAA and in places of employment.

Contribute to the SAA Student Chapter Manual
Part of an SAA student chapter? Consider adding your expertise to the SAA Student Chapter Manual, now in progress.

Check out SAA’s new Internship Directory! 

MLIS (or equal) grad in US: Survey: Career Impact of Student Participation in Professional LIS Organizations

 

SAA Upcoming Deadlines

Call for Proposals and Presenters: The Liberated Archive Forum
Proposals are due March 13.

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Student Experiences: Michael Harris on Online Programs

This post is part of the Student Experience series, which features current and former archives students as they reflect on graduate school, internships, and early career issues. If you would like to contribute a post for this series, please email me

Guest poster Michael Harris, Simmons College online student and archivist at the University of Colorado Special Collections and Archives, discusses how he chose to do an online program and the successes and struggles he’s found with it.  Continue reading

Chat with us tomorrow, February 15th!

Please join the SAA Students and New Archives Professionals Section for the next #snaprt Twitter chat with Documenting the Now on February 15, at 8 pm ET.

Topic: Ethics and Archiving Social Media: Perspectives from Students and New Archives Professionals.

We welcome everyone to join or keep up with our chat using the #snaprt and/or #docnowcommunity hashtags on Twitter. The SNAP Section Twitter account will pose questions such as:

  • Should we seek consent from individuals before collecting their social media data for the long term? Why? #snaprt #docnowcommunity

  • What do you see as some of the major technical challenges to considering ethics when archiving the web? #snaprt #docnowcommunity

  • Does your LIS program cover issues around the ethics of archiving the Internet? If not, how should they address it? #snaprt #docnowcommunity

  • How should we approach collecting born-digital materials? Should we take a collect it all now and worry later approach? #snaprt #docnowcommunity

  • Should we consider ethics and community engagement before we start collecting born-digital materials? #snaprt #docnowcommunity

  • How can we ethically collect born-digital materials and protect individuals privacy? #snaprt #docnowcommunity

  • What are the challenges moving forward with collecting born digital materials? Social media? #snaprt #docnowcommunity

  • What are you doing to balance ethical considerations with institutional and community needs? #snap #docnowcommunity

We welcome everyone to join or keep up with this chat using the #snaprt and/or ##docnowcommunity hashtag on Twitter. If you would like to have a discussion topic included in this chat, please send it to @SNAP_Section  on Twitter, submit it through the anonymous form on the SNAP chat webpage or e-mail the SNAP Senior Social Media Coordinator at emcolonm@umich.edu.

Here some resources related to tomorrow’s chat you may want to check out. Please share additional resources using #snaprt on Twitter or through.