Tag Archives: Shira Peltzman

SAA 2017: Session 201 What We Talk About When We Talk About Processing Born-Digital: Building a Framework for Shared Practice

In advance of the 2017 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Michael Barera, Archivist, Texas A&M University-Commerce

This session consisted of a panel-led presentation and discussion conducted by Sally DeBauche, Erin Faulder, Shira Peltzman, Kate Tasker, and Dorothy Waugh. Other members of their group who had contributed to the project but were not present at the session were Susanne Annand, Marty Gengenbach, Julie Goldsmith, and Laura Jackson.

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Code4Lib 2016

Guest author: Steve Duckworth
Processing Archivist, University of Florida

Code4Lib 2016 was held in Philadelphia, PA from March 7 to 10 along with a day of pre-conference workshops. The core Code4Lib community consists of “developers and technologists for libraries, museums, and archives who have a strong commitment to open technologies,”1 but they are quite open and welcoming to any tangentially related person or institution. As a processing archivist whose main experience has been with paper documents, I thought I would feel confused and out of place for the length of this conference, but, while I had my moments, I left feeling more knowledgeable about efforts and innovations within the coding community, giddy with ideas of projects to bring to my own workplace, and incredibly glad that I stepped outside of my archival comfort zone to attend (and present at!) this conference. (And I have to thank our university’s Metadata Librarian, Allison Jai O’Dell, for asking me to present with her. Without her reaching out to me, I likely wouldn’t have gotten involved in the conference to begin with.)

So, before Code4Lib, there was Code4Arc – at least, as a preconference workshop. Code4Arc focused on the specific coding and technology needs of the archivist community and on the need to make Code4Arc an actual thing, rather than just an attachment to Code4Lib. While both communities would have quite a bit of overlap, archivists obviously have their own niche problems, and coders can often help sort those problems out. Also, having a direct line between consumer-with-a-problem and developer-with-a-solution would prove quite beneficial to all parties involved. The day was divided up into a series of informal discussions and more focused breakout groups, along with some updates from developers. The end result mainly boiled down to continuing the discussion about our needs as a community, communicating and sharing knowledge and data more openly, and focusing efforts on specific problems that affect many archives. We’ve formed some ad hoc groups and will likely have more to say in the not-too-distant future.

C4L1As to the conference proper, I’ll start by noting that a ton of information is available online. The conference site lists presentations, presenter bios, and links to twitter handles and slides where available. Three series of Lightning Talks emerged during the conference; information on those talks can be found on the wiki, which is full of useful information and links. And everything was recorded, so you can watch the presentations from the Code4Lib YouTube channel. The conference presentations were almost a series of lightning talks themselves. Each presentation was allotted 10-20 minutes of time, with 6 groups of presentations given over the course of the conference, along with 2 plenary talks. So, while it was a nice change from the general conference configuration, it did make for a rather exhausting (but engaging) experience. Having said that, I will only specifically mention a few of the presentations that resounded more with me or relate more specifically to archival work (because seriously, I saw over 50 in the course of 2.5 days). But again, I stress, totally worth it! And they feed you. A lot! Continue reading