Tag Archives: annual meeting

controlaccess: Relevant Subjects in Archives and Related Fields 2017-06-18

This is the weekly roundup of headlines in and around archives, including some library, museum, digital humanities, and information science things as well. If you see something we’ve missed, please email us!

SAA News

Spring/Summer issue of The American Archivist is out!

ARCHIVES 2017 Registration is now Open! Early Bird Deadline is July 6

 

Act Now to Save NHPRC, NEH, and IMLS!

SAA Bookstore to Close for Inventory

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SAA 2016: New Member Coffee Break and Plenary I, Getting Our House in Order: Moving from Diversity to Inclusion

In advance of the 2016 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, roundtable and section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Blake Relle, Archives Specialist at the Louisiana State Archives

New Member/Coffee Break

On Thursday morning, I attended the New Member/First Time Coffee Break. I know this will surprise you, but I had Green Tea instead of coffee. Unlike at my last SAA conference, I walked around the room and introduced myself to several people. One person I spoke with was Erin Lawrimore. She is the council liaison for the SNAP Roundtable and she is writing a blog regards to her experience on the SAA Council. You can read her blog here. The topic of her blog is a great idea. The blog will give SAA members insight into the workings of the council as well as inspire people to take on leadership role in either SAA or another archival organization. I ran into Myles Crowley, who I met in Pittsburgh as well as came to the REPS meet up at Max Lagers.

Plenary I

After the coffee (more like tea) break, it was off to hear the Plenary Speeches. They were two speeches.  The first speech was made by David Ferriero, who is the Archivist for the United States. He spoke about diversity and inclusion. He reminded us that we need to foster a culture promotes inclusion and diversity. He reminded us the our nation derives its strength from being open to diversity and including everyone. We need to educate our workforce about the importance of having a workplace that values inclusion. He also reminded us to interview candidates for job openings through an inclusive lens. Continue reading

SAA 2016: SNAP Roundtable Meeting

In advance of the 2016 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, roundtable and section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Guest Author: Michael Barera, Archivist at Texas A&M University-Commerce

 

After a brief welcome and chair report by Samantha Winn, the Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) Roundtable session began in earnest with a short speech followed by a question and answer session with Society of American Archivists (SAA) President Dennis Meissner. He began by stating: “All of us in Council and across the leadership of SAA really value SNAP…there is more innovation, energy, and good ideas in SNAP than in many other parts of the organization.” He also explained the transformation away from the current sections and roundtables into the “affinity group” structure “with equal weight and identity”: they will all be called sections, will be unlimited in terms of participation for SAA members, formal bylaws and annual reports will be required for all sections, and non-SAA members will be allowed to belong to up to 3 of the online discussion lists for these new “sections”. He also noted that the new direction on this change has largely been informed by member feedback, including that of SNAPers. Furthermore, Meissner stressed that SAA is “doubling down in the area of diversity and inclusion…in the next few years”, that “diversity is an important goal of the organization”, and it is becoming an even more crucial goal that is “baked into the firmament of the organization”. In his conception, cultural competence will be the starting point, and SNAP will play a crucial role in increasing SAA’s diversity: “I think this is really going to be something that consumes us.”

After his speech, Meissner answered a couple of questions from SNAP members. Firstly, when asked what would be a successful version of SNAP for all of SAA, he responded: “SNAP is recognized by the rest of SAA leadership as almost a ‘skunk works’ within the organization that pushes up new ideas…I think SNAP can be effective when it pushes on the organization…it can serve as a weather vane for the organization, showing where things ought to be going.” He also argued that not being “encumbered by legacy thinking” is a core attribute of SNAP, and that it helps SAA itself be a “more nimble and agile organization”. Secondly, he was asked about what are some of the ways that SAA at large addresses the issues that particularly affect members of SNAP, such as unpaid internships and unpaid loan debt. Meissner responded: “I don’t think that Council has any particular way to address them…we look to guidance from all the sections and associations for more innovative ways to do this…I certainly don’t have any answers in my back pocket, these are things that work themselves out in the workplace and archival education over time.” More optimistically, he noted that “good paid internships that mean something…are a good starting place.” Continue reading

#snaprt Chat Flashback: Prepping for #SAA16

If you’re heading to Atlanta next week, you’ll want to check out the #snaprt Chat Flashback from Monday, July 25. There’s solid advice for new and old attendees alike. I’m getting really excited about next week and hope you are, too!

Help Us Cover SAA for Those Who are #SAALeftBehind

It’s that time of year, y’all – the time where we ask you to cover sessions of SAA so that we can recap them for those who are not going to this year’s conference. (See #SAALeftBehind.) We’re good people who love our fellow archivists, so let’s make them part of the process from afar!

We have identified sessions we feel are particularly interesting for SNAP members, but the blog team will happily accept summaries for any sessions, plenary events, roundtable and section meetings, and other formal conference events. Volunteer authors have 2-4 weeks after the conference to send in their summaries, depending on what kind of session you have signed up for. Feel free to partner up with another author to cover a session, too.

As in past years, we have a sign-up sheet. Please sign your full name and how we can contact you. It’s okay if you realize you’re not going to be able to cover a session, but try to take your name off the sheet at least a day prior to the session, pretty please, so that Lily, Anna, and I know we have a space to fill.

Here are links to 2014 summaries and 2015 summaries.

Thanks, everyone!

SAA 2015: Session 602, Beers, Booths, and Budgets: Collaborative Models for Outreach and Advocacy

In advance of the 2015 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, roundtable and section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

One of the major themes of ARCHIVES 2015 was “advocacy and outreach.” Much of that focused on how individual institutions, individual archivists, and regional associations could affectively reach out to their communities (and community leaders). Session 602, however, approached this call from a “bigger is better” approach, creating events in four cities – two crawls and two bazaars – that allowed repositories to work together to increase the footprint of their outreach efforts.

Though the panelists went in order from newest to oldest event, I think it makes more sense to group the types of events together, beginning with the Oregon Archives Crawl. Diana Banning, the city archivist for Portland, helped hatch the idea of the crawl to mimic a beer crawl, to bring in people who wouldn’t normally go to archives, but also to increase community awareness and strengthen ties among the institutions within the Portland and Willamette Valley area. Four large institutions within walking distance make up the sites to visit, and they host other institutions, who set up booths with information about their collections. A passport is created each year that crawl participants must get stamped as they visit the different locations. Only by having a fully-stamped passport can they be entered in drawings for prizes. The passport not only works to ensure the participants visit all the sites, it also includes information about the repositories that the crawl participants can take with them. The Oregon Archives Crawl manages to put on the event through in-kind donations and grant awards, so there are no out of pocket costs. This includes the cost of advertising in the local alternative weekly paper. Through informal polling, the Oregon Archives Crawl organizers have found that roughly a quarter of participants at each of the crawls have never been to any of the repositories before. Continue reading

SAA 2015: Session 701, But Where Is It? Access Tools for Born-Digital Records

In advance of the 2015 Annual Meeting, we invited SNAP members to contribute summaries of panels, roundtable and section meetings, forums, and pop-up sessions. Summaries represent the opinions of their individual authors; they are not necessarily endorsed by SNAP, members of the SNAP Steering Committee, or SAA.

Session 701 looked at how five different repositories – one federal, four college and university – provided patrons with access to born-digital collections. Moderator Tammi Kim, Assistant Librarian for the University of Delaware Library, began the session by introducing the panel, then opened the floor to the panelists.

Julia Corrin, University Archivist for Carnegie Mellon University, discussed the challenges of providing access to born-digital materials as a lone arranger. In a good week, she is able to spend about five hours on born-digital materials. Corrin pointed out that for small archives, sometimes it’s intimidating to go to a conference like SAA, though hoping to get ideas, because it feels like everyone else has access to so many more resources. She likened it to cats, though. Even though cat palaces are wonderful, most cats are more than happy with a plain old cardboard box. The same is true with researchers. As long as they have access to the materials, there is less worry (from them) about the delivery method. It’s better to do something than nothing, so at CMU, the goal is to “provide as much access as we can to as much as we can however we can.” Continue reading